Carbon Tax News

Let Wiser help you stay up-to-date with all of the carbon tax news that you need. Our tailor-made digest collates the best articles from around the internet and delivers them to you in an easy-to-read daily email. The issue of carbon dioxide emissions is one that has vexed legislators, business executives and environmentalists for decades. How do you reduce greenhouse gasses while at the same time allowing businesses to compete, remain profitable, and pass on lower costs to consumers? For many countries, the answer is a carbon tax. Some US states have also introduced the tax, although it is not nationwide. When it is in place businesses have to pay a set priced based on the amount of carbon dioxide that they produce through the burning of fossil fuels. This cost is typically passed onto consumers. The issue of greenhouse gas emissions will be around for many years to come, and carbon taxes will remain a key part of the debate. This is why you need the latest carbon tax news. The Wiser daily digest gives you exactly that, directly to your inbox and sourced from the best information on the internet. Register today.

Recent Carbon Tax News Coverage
 
Your Weekly Recommendations Wednesday, April 25, 2018
 
Recommended for you
Climate Lawsuits, Once Limited to the Coasts, Jump Inland
The New York Times • John Schwartz
Trump’s new executive order spells disaster for our air quality.
Grist • Justine Calma
These 5 artists are sketching out the future of climate action.
Grist • Grist Staff
World Agrees to Cut Shipping Emissions 50 Percent by 2050
Inside Climate News • John H. Cushman, Jr.
‘Day Zero’ isn’t just Cape Town’s problem. It’s a global phenomenon.
Grist • Kate Yoder
New Jersey Takes a Big Step Toward Renewable Energy (and Nuclear Gets Help, for Now)
The New York Times • Brad Plumer, Nick Corasaniti
Most Americans think climate change has a place in education.
Grist • Greta Jochem
As Pruitt gets buried in scandal, Andrew Wheeler is one step closer to taking charge of the EPA.
Grist • Zoya Teirstein
Striking Teachers in Coal and Gas Country Are Forcing States to Rethink Energy Company Giveaways
First Look Media • Kate Aronoff
North Dakota is the first state with the power to decide how it will bury carbon.
Grist • Nathanael Johnson
 
Recommended for You
Carbon Tax, Climate Change
Climate Lawsuits, Once Limited to the Coasts, Jump Inland
The New York TimesJohn Schwartz
SEE MY OPTIONS Image Until recently, communities suing fossil fuel companies over the costs of climate change have been located on the coasts: cities and counties in California, and New York City. But now, the litigation has jumped inland. Boulder and San...
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Carbon Tax, Climate Change
Trump’s new executive order spells disaster for our air quality.
GristJustine Calma
While we were all watching the Wheeler and Pruitt train wreck on Thursday, President Trump nonchalantly gave industry a huge pass to pollute. The executive order makes it easier for businesses to comply with air quality standards, and also limits the EPA’s...
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Carbon Tax, Climate Change
These 5 artists are sketching out the future of climate action.
GristGrist Staff
According to an article in Yale Climate Communications, art can help us “see what can be difficult to see” — something that’s particularly important for climate change, which often affects us in invisible ways. We interviewed some of the artists provoking thoughtful...
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Biofuels, Carbon Tax
World Agrees to Cut Shipping Emissions 50 Percent by 2050
Inside Climate NewsJohn H. Cushman, Jr.
The UN's International Maritime Organization has approved the world's first broad agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions from worldwide ocean shipping and said it hopes to phase them out entirely "as soon as possible in this century." The agency called the agreement,...
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Barack Obama, Carbon Tax
‘Day Zero’ isn’t just Cape Town’s problem. It’s a global phenomenon.
GristKate Yoder
no drought about it In January, officials in the drought-stricken South African city began counting down the days until the point that millions of taps would run dry. They called that point “Day Zero.” While conservation measures helped Cape Town avoid that...
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Carbon Tax, Nuclear Power
New Jersey Takes a Big Step Toward Renewable Energy (and Nuclear Gets Help, for Now)
The New York TimesBrad Plumer, Nick Corasaniti
TRENTON — New Jersey significantly altered the future of its energy sector on Thursday, passing two bills that set ambitious goals for expanding renewable power and curtailing greenhouse gases in the state. The bills, which require power companies in New Jersey to...
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Carbon Tax, Climate Change
Most Americans think climate change has a place in education.
GristGreta Jochem
Seventy-eight percent say that schools should teach kids about global warming, according to a recent analysis by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. Still, not everyone agrees. In recent years, several states have introduced bills that would take climate science out...
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Carbon Tax, Climate Change
As Pruitt gets buried in scandal, Andrew Wheeler is one step closer to taking charge of the EPA.
GristZoya Teirstein
Wheeling and dealing Sick of hearing about Scott Pruitt’s transgressions yet? No? Here are a few more, then: Kevin Chmielewski, Pruitt’s ex-deputy chief of staff, told members of Congress that Pruitt told staffers to find excuses for him to fly home to...
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Carbon Tax, Coal Industry
Striking Teachers in Coal and Gas Country Are Forcing States to Rethink Energy Company Giveaways
First Look MediaKate Aronoff
Like most billionaires, Oklahoma oilman Harold Hamm is not accustomed to doing things for himself. For that, there are people: people to drill wells, people to clean up after him, people to drive him from here to there, and — almost certainly...
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Carbon Tax, Climate Change
North Dakota is the first state with the power to decide how it will bury carbon.
GristNathanael Johnson
On Tuesday, the Trump administration shifted the responsibility for regulating carbon storage in North Dakota from the federal government to the state. The idea is that regulators on the ground might do a better job than the feds. That follows a recent...
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