Climate Change News

Climate change affects everyone, but it is important to have the facts. That's why you need the Wiser climate change news email. It is a free and easy-to-read digest featuring the latest news, information and debates on this important topic. And it is delivered to your inbox every day so you will never be out of touch with the science, the policies or the arguments again. According to NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency and other scientific and environmental organizations, the Earth's climate is changing. The vast majority of those organizations attribute most of this change to human activity, and they say the rate of change is unlike anything the world has experienced before. That leaves choices for everyone, from individual consumers through to businesses and governments. The scientific debates, as well as discussions on what can be done to slow climate change, are ongoing. New technologies are likely to form part of the solution, as are changes in human behavior alongside new laws and regulations. Sign up to the climate change news email today so that you stay up-to-date with all the latest developments.

Recent Climate Change News Coverage
 
Your Weekly Recommendations Wednesday, April 25, 2018
 
Recommended for you
Hey millennials, don’t fall for Shell’s pop star PR | Graham Readfearn
The Guardian • Graham Readfearn
Foreign Office climate staff cut by 25% under Boris Johnson
The Guardian • Damian Carrington Environment Editor
The EPA’s deputy chief may be an even bigger threat to the environment than Scott Pruitt
The Verge • Alessandra Potenza
BP chief urges Cambridge University to keep fossil fuel investments
The Guardian • Adam Vaughan
The Energy 202: Why Scott Pruitt's decision on burning wood is so high stakes
Washington Post • Dino Grandoni
The yogurt cure: can ‘good’ bacteria save bats?
New Scientist • Sharon Oosthoek
Almost 1500 bird species face extinction and we’re to blame
New Scientist • Andy Coghlan
War veteran gets world’s first penis and scrotum transplant
New Scientist • Jessica Hamzelou
We need hope, not eulogies, for the Great Barrier Reef
New Scientist
Ants build a medieval ‘torture rack’ to catch grasshoppers
New Scientist • Jake Buehler
 
Recommended for You
Climate Change, Coal Industry
Hey millennials, don’t fall for Shell’s pop star PR | Graham Readfearn
The GuardianGraham Readfearn
If you’re a millennial, the global oil and gas company Shell will have been most pleased if you’d seen one their #makethefuture music videos. Twice now Shell have lined up superstars including Jennifer Hudson, Pixie Lott and Yemi Alade to sing about...
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Climate Change, Diplomacy
Foreign Office climate staff cut by 25% under Boris Johnson
The GuardianDamian Carrington Environment Editor
The number of full-time officials dedicated to climate change in the Foreign Office has dropped by almost 25% in the two years since Boris Johnson became foreign secretary, according to data released under freedom of information (FoI) rules. Johnson has also failed...
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Climate Change, Energy Regulation
The EPA’s deputy chief may be an even bigger threat to the environment than Scott Pruitt
The VergeAlessandra Potenza
Photo by Pete Marovich / Getty Images Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, is no friend of the agency he leads. Since he entered office, Pruitt has tried to roll back multiple regulations that curb greenhouse gas emissions and...
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Coal Industry, Environment
BP chief urges Cambridge University to keep fossil fuel investments
The GuardianAdam Vaughan
BP’s chief executive has come under fire from campaigners after he urged Cambridge University not to drop its fossil fuel investments. Bob Dudley was greeted with laughter when he told an industry conference on Tuesday: “We donate and do lots of research...
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Elections & Polls, Greenhouse Gases
The Energy 202: Why Scott Pruitt's decision on burning wood is so high stakes
Washington PostDino Grandoni
While carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of wood go into the air immediately, trees take decades or more to grow back. So if anything happens to interfere with their growth -- say, a forest fire -- the trees will not be...
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Climate Change, Energy & Utilities
The yogurt cure: can ‘good’ bacteria save bats?
New ScientistSharon Oosthoek
Jared Hobbs/All Canada Photos/Alamy By Sharon Oosthoek “THINK yogurt for bats,” says Cori Lausen. “We’re working with probiotics.” But instead of eating this cocktail of “good” microbes, they get doused with it. The plan sounds a bit, er, batty but it could...
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Climate Change, Energy & Utilities
Almost 1500 bird species face extinction and we’re to blame
New ScientistAndy Coghlan
Danny Green / naturepl.com By Andy Coghlan 1469 bird species are threatened with extinction, warns a global report. That is around one-eighth of the 10,966 known species. Farming is the biggest single threat. 74 per cent of the threatened birds – 1091...
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Climate Change, Energy & Utilities
War veteran gets world’s first penis and scrotum transplant
New ScientistJessica Hamzelou
john hopkins medicine By Jessica Hamzelou A man in the US has become the first to receive a combined penis and scrotum transplant. The man, who wishes to remain anonymous, underwent the procedure on 26 March, and appears to be recovering well....
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Climate Change, Coral Reefs
We need hope, not eulogies, for the Great Barrier Reef
New Scientist
THE obituary has been written many times, but, until now, reports of the Great Barrier Reef’s death have been exaggerated. So what are we to make of the latest scientific assessment, which concludes that the reef’s health is failing badly (see “Our...
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Climate Change, Energy & Utilities
Ants build a medieval ‘torture rack’ to catch grasshoppers
New ScientistJake Buehler
Markus Schmidt By Jake Buehler Tropical ants build and set a trap that resembles a medieval torture rack. They use this ingenious setup to capture insect prey much larger than themselves, then rip the victim apart. These ants have transformed the characteristic...
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