Cybercrime News

Cybercrime is growing and more people are falling victim to it. The Wiser daily cybercrime news email is designed for anyone with an interest in the topic. This includes professionals in the industry, from technology providers to law enforcement officials to security consultants. It is estimated that criminals now make more money from cybercrime than they do from illegal drug trafficking. Large corporations, SMEs and individuals are all at risk. Cybercrime involves any crime that uses a computer or network. It takes many forms including identity theft, stealing company data, and other malicious practices. And it is global in nature, with many of the criminals based in different countries to their target victims. And because it is growing more resources are being allocated to combat it, while technology companies come up with new products and solutions that offer better protection. And there is growing awareness among technology users to better protect their systems, accounts and passwords. The Wiser daily cybercrime news email covers all of these topics and more. We curate the best articles from leading publications and writers in the field to ensure you get the latest information delivered to your inbox every day.

Recent Cybercrime News Coverage
 
Your Weekly Recommendations Sunday, February 18, 2018
 
Recommended for you
Cyber security in (big) numbers
BetaNews • Ian Barker
Siemens and Partners Sign Joint Charter on Cybersecurity
BusinessWire
CYBERSECURITY THREAT TO RENEWABLE ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE
Global Banking & Finance Review • Editor Gbaf
White House Threatens ‘Consequences’ for 2017 Russian Cyber Attack
Defense One - All Content • Patrick Tucker
Australia Joins UK, US in Accusing Russia of 'NotPetya' Cyberattack
RIA Novosti
Russians behind bars in US after nicking $300m+ in credit-card hacks
The Register • Iain Thomson
US blames Moscow for NotPetya malware, which hit Russia too
RT - Daily news • Rt
US, Britain blame Russia for 'NotPetya' ransomware attack
The Straits Times
MHA charts out course for law, police officers to tackle cybercrime better
The Indian Express » Section » India • Rahul Tripathi
U.S. Condemns Russia for Cyberattack, Showing Split in Stance on Putin
The New York Times • Mark Landler, Scott Shane
 
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Cybercrime, Security Software & Services
Cyber security in (big) numbers
BetaNewsIan Barker
Network security company Bricata has produced an infographic that sets out some of the statistics to put things into context. These include the average cost of a breach, currently $7.35 million; the average CISO salary, $273,000, and venture capitalists investing $3.5 billion...
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Cybercrime, Private Equity
Siemens and Partners Sign Joint Charter on Cybersecurity
BusinessWire
MUNICH--(BUSINESS WIRE)--At the Munich Security Conference today, Siemens and eight partners from industry will sign the first joint charter for greater cybersecurity. Initiated by Siemens, the Charter of Trust calls for binding rules and standards to build trust in cybersecurity and further...
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Cybercrime, Energy Finance
CYBERSECURITY THREAT TO RENEWABLE ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE
Global Banking & Finance ReviewEditor Gbaf
Renewable energy technologies have established a significant role in the energy industry. Because of their prominence and growing importance to power supplies, it is vital for the industry to develop appropriate security, and specifically cybersecurity, strategies. A new report from energy sector...
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Cybercrime, Politics & Policy
White House Threatens ‘Consequences’ for 2017 Russian Cyber Attack
Defense One - All ContentPatrick Tucker
In an unusual public statement, the White House fingered Russia and said it would respond with unspecified “international consequences" to NotPetya. The White House has promised unspecified “international consequences” for a June 2017 Russian military cyber attack against Ukraine that went on...
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Cybercrime, Politics & Policy
Australia Joins UK, US in Accusing Russia of 'NotPetya' Cyberattack
RIA Novosti
MOSCOW (Sputnik) - Australia on Friday joined the United States and the United Kingdom in blaming Russia for orchestrating last year’s ransomware attack on mostly Ukrainian servers. Law Enforcement and Cyber Security Minister Angus Taylor said in a statement he had consulted...
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Credit Cards, Credit Services
Russians behind bars in US after nicking $300m+ in credit-card hacks
The RegisterIain Thomson
Pair partly responsible for largest bank-card theft ring in American history Two Russian criminals have been sent down in America after pleading guilty to helping run the largest credit-card hacking scam in US history. Muscovites Vladimir Drinkman, 37, and Dmitriy Smilianets, 34,...
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Cybercrime, Politics & Policy
US blames Moscow for NotPetya malware, which hit Russia too
RT - Daily newsRt
Get short URL The White House has blamed the Russian military for the NotPetya malware attack, which hit major companies and government systems across the globe in June 2017, including in the US, UK, Ukraine and Russia. In a statement on Thursday,...
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Cybercrime, Politics & Policy
US, Britain blame Russia for 'NotPetya' ransomware attack
The Straits Times
February 16, 2018 9:33 AM WASHINGTON (AFP) - The United States and Britain on Thursday (Feb 15) blamed the Russian military for last year's devastating "NotPetya" ransomware attack, calling it a Kremlin effort to destabilise Ukraine which spun out of control.
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Cybercrime, Reporting & Storytelling
MHA charts out course for law, police officers to tackle cybercrime better
The Indian Express » Section » IndiaRahul Tripathi
In the first such exercise to upgrade the quality of cybercrime investigations, the Union Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) has rolled out a programme for judicial officers, prosecutors and police officers to study significant cybercrime cases. Among these are the 2004 DPS...
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Cybercrime, Elections & Polls
U.S. Condemns Russia for Cyberattack, Showing Split in Stance on Putin
The New York TimesMark Landler, Scott Shane
WASHINGTON — The United States on Thursday joined Britain in formally blaming Russia for a huge cyberattack last June that was aimed at Ukraine but crippled computers worldwide, a highly public naming-and-shaming exercise that could further fray relations with Moscow. The White...
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