Cybercrime News

Cybercrime is growing and more people are falling victim to it. The Wiser daily cybercrime news email is designed for anyone with an interest in the topic. This includes professionals in the industry, from technology providers to law enforcement officials to security consultants. It is estimated that criminals now make more money from cybercrime than they do from illegal drug trafficking. Large corporations, SMEs and individuals are all at risk. Cybercrime involves any crime that uses a computer or network. It takes many forms including identity theft, stealing company data, and other malicious practices. And it is global in nature, with many of the criminals based in different countries to their target victims. And because it is growing more resources are being allocated to combat it, while technology companies come up with new products and solutions that offer better protection. And there is growing awareness among technology users to better protect their systems, accounts and passwords. The Wiser daily cybercrime news email covers all of these topics and more. We curate the best articles from leading publications and writers in the field to ensure you get the latest information delivered to your inbox every day.

Recent Cybercrime News Coverage
 
Your Weekly Recommendations Tuesday, April 25, 2017
 
Recommended for you
Russian Hackers Who Targeted Clinton Appear to Attack France’s Macron
The New York Times • Nicole Perlroth
Man-Up By Investing In ManTech International
Seeking Alpha • Harold Goldmeier
U.S. Court Sentences Multi-Millionaire Russian Hacker to a Record-Setting 27 YearsU.S. Court Sentences Multi-Millionaire Russian Hacker to a Record-Setting 27 Years
Inc. • Minda Zetlin
New doctrine to ensure 3 military wings can tackle entire spectrum of conflicts
The Economic Times of India • Rajat Pandit
Russian Gets Longest U.S. Hacking Sentence Ever
Fortune Magazine • David Z. Morris
Russian hacker Roman Seleznev sentenced to 27 years
Al Jazeera
There's now a tool to test for NSA spyware
CIO • Michael Kan
Russian man gets longest-ever US hacking sentence, 27 years in prison
Ars Technica • Joe Mullin
Meet the hacker who gets paid to break into Twitter's website
BBC
Devilishly Clever Scam Sites Could Fool Even the Most Cautious Into Revealing Their Passwords
Inc. • Minda Zetlin
 
Recommended for You
Cybercrime, Elections & Polls
Russian Hackers Who Targeted Clinton Appear to Attack France’s Macron
The New York TimesNicole Perlroth
The campaign of the French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron has been targeted by what appears to be the same Russian operatives responsible for hacks of Democratic campaign officials before last year’s American presidential election, a cybersecurity firm warns in a new report....
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Cybercrime, Homeland Security
Man-Up By Investing In ManTech International
Seeking AlphaHarold Goldmeier
Summary Firms acting like sheriffs protect data and prevent tampering dominate cyber security industry but don’t overlook investment opportunities in cyber warriors, ensuring national defense and attacking enemies. ManTech International engages in intelligence and warfare systems worldwide, providing embedded counterterror analytical expertise,...
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Credit Cards, Credit Services
U.S. Court Sentences Multi-Millionaire Russian Hacker to a Record-Setting 27 YearsU.S. Court Sentences Multi-Millionaire Russian Hacker to a Record-Setting 27 Years
Inc.Minda Zetlin
This image is hidden. Clickto adjust visibility. AddImage They say crime doesn't pay, but that's not necessarily true when you're a talented Russian hacker. Just ask Roman Seleznev, the 32-year-old master hacker who spent the last several years dividing his time between...
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Cybercrime, Politics & Policy
New doctrine to ensure 3 military wings can tackle entire spectrum of conflicts
The Economic Times of IndiaRajat Pandit
NEW DELHI: The armed forces have formulated a new "joint doctrine" to ensure the Army, Navy and IAF plan and work together to effectively tackle the entire spectrum of conflict, ranging from full blown conventional wars to irregular and hybrid warfare, in...
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Credit Cards, Credit Services
Russian Gets Longest U.S. Hacking Sentence Ever
Fortune MagazineDavid Z. Morris
A Russian hacker specializing in stolen credit card numbers has been sentenced in Seattle to 27 years in prison. Roman Seleznev, also known as Track2, was described by prosecutors as not just a prolific thief, but as a “pioneer” who helped create...
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Credit Cards, Credit Services
Russian hacker Roman Seleznev sentenced to 27 years
Al Jazeera
A federal judge has handed down the longest sentence ever imposed in the US for a cybercrime case to the son of a member of the Russian Parliament convicted of hacking into more than 500 US businesses and stealing millions of credit...
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Antivirus Software, Cybercrime
There's now a tool to test for NSA spyware
CIOMichael Kan
Has your computer been infected with a suspected NSA spying implant? A security researcher has come up with a free tool that can tell. Luke Jennings of security firm Countercept wrote a script in response to last week’s high-profile leak of cyberweapons...
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Credit Cards, Credit Services
Russian man gets longest-ever US hacking sentence, 27 years in prison
Ars TechnicaJoe Mullin
Russian hacker Roman Seleznev was sentenced to 27 years in prison today. He was convicted of causing more than $169 million in damage by hacking into point-of-sale computers. Seleznev, aka "Track2," would hack into computers belonging to both small businesses and large...
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Cybercrime, Technology Industry
Meet the hacker who gets paid to break into Twitter's website
BBC
because of easy-to-use hacking tools online, says the National Crime Agency. But there is a way of legally hacking company websites - and even getting paid for it. Jake Davis, known online as Topiary, was arrested for illegal hacking in 2011 but...
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Cybercrime, Google Inc
Devilishly Clever Scam Sites Could Fool Even the Most Cautious Into Revealing Their Passwords
Inc.Minda Zetlin
This image is hidden. Clickto adjust visibility. AddImage You've probably gotten this advice many times: Before you click on a link, or certainly before you enter your username and password on a website, carefully check the URL that pops up in your...
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